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BE Seminar: “Immunomodulatory Biomaterials for Limb Salvage”

Diabetes and peripheral arterial disease affect hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Patients with these conditions frequently develop chronic wounds on the lower limbs that lead to amputation, with a 5-year mortality rate as high as 77%. Macrophages, the primary cell of the innate immune system, are critical regulators of angiogenesis and wound healing. Their […]

BE Seminar: “High-throughput T cell repertoire profiling enabled systems immunology and immune engineering”

T cells are important to the initiation, prevention, and cure of many diseases. For example, various T cells based cancer immunotherapies have been quite effective in treating several types of cancers. However, a significant fraction of patients do not respond. A comprehensive understanding of the complexity of the T cells repertoire in health and diseases […]

MEAM Seminar: “Physics-Informed Neural Networks (PINNs) for Physical Problems & Biological Problems”

We will present a new approach to develop a data-driven, learning-based framework for predicting outcomes of physical and biological systems and for discovering hidden physics from noisy data. We will introduce a deep learning approach based on neural networks (NNs) and generative adversarial networks (GANs). We also introduce new NNs that learn functionals and nonlinear […]

BE Seminar: “Nanofluidic Technologies for Biomolecule Manipulation”

In the last 20 years, microfabrication techniques have allowed researchers to miniaturize tools for a plethora of bioanalytical applications.  In addition to better sensitivity, accuracy and precision, scaling down the size of bioanalytical tools has led to the exploitation of new technologies to further manipulate biomolecules in ways that has never before been achieved. For […]

MEAM Seminar: “Origami Micro, Bio, and Nanosystems “

Due to the inherent planarity of conventional micro and nanofabrication, it is challenging to pattern and assemble micro, bio, and nano-materials and devices in all three dimensions. Origami inspired mechanical assembly by curving, bending, and folding of appropriately designed micro and nanopatterned precursors provides a high-throughput solution to address this challenge. In this talk, I […]

Herman P. Schwan Distinguished Lecture: “Engineering human tissues for medical impact”

The classical paradigm of tissue engineering involves the integrated use of human stem cells, biomaterial scaffolds (providing a structural and logistic template for tissue formation) and bioreactors (providing environmental control, dynamic sequences of molecular and physical signaling, and insights into the structure and function of the forming tissues). This “biomimetic” approach results in an increasingly […]

MEAM Seminar: “Architecture in Biological Materials: A Template for Toughness Enhancement, or a Siren Song?”

Structural biological materials, such as animal bones and shells, display remarkable mechanical properties despite being composed of quite simple and ordinary constituent materials. For example, the toughness of nacre, a structural biological material found in the shells of some mollusks, is orders of magnitude higher than that of its primary constituent—the calcium based mineral aragonite. […]

BE Seminar: “Developing neuroengineering solutions of biomedical relevance using crayfish as a model system”

In my talk, I will first describe one of the main projects in my lab that investigates the underlying cellular-molecular mechanisms for changes in alcohol sensitivity of crayfish with different prior social experiences. In this context, I will explain why “simple” invertebrates may provide unique advantages for studying complex phenomena such as socially-dependent drug effects. […]

MEAM Seminar: “Mechanical Models for DNA”

We will discuss two complementary mechanical models for DNA that deal with, respectively two problems: one, phase transitions in a DNA molecule, and two, allosteric interactions between two ligands bound to DNA. Experimental studies on single molecules of DNA have reported a rich variety of cooperative structural transitions, including coexistence of three phases, when a […]

BE Doctoral Dissertation Defense: “Multi-scale Brain Responses in the Development of Persistent Osteoarthritic Temporomandibular Pain”

The Department of Bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania and Drs. Eric Granquist and Beth Winkelstein are pleased to announce the Doctoral Dissertation Defense of Megan Sperry. The public is welcome to attend.

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