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March 2021

ESE Seminar: “Megahertz Power Electronics in Transportation and Healthcare Applications”

March 9 at 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Zoom – Email ESE for Link jbatter@seas.upenn.edu

The efficient use of electrical energy is a foundation of modern society. Power electronics is at the core of electrical energy conversion and greatly impacts a system’s size, performance, and cost. High-performance miniaturized power electronics can be a key enabling technology for many emerging applications, such as electric vehicles (EV), medical devices, and soft- and micro-robotics. This talk presents a new generation of power electronic devices that leverage high-frequency (3-300 MHz) operations to reduce energy storage requirements and achieve a…

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ESE Seminar: “Demystifying (Deep) Reinforcement Learning: The Optimist, The Pessimist, and Their Provable Efficiency”

March 12 at 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Zoom – Email ESE for Link jbatter@seas.upenn.edu

Coupled with powerful function approximators such as deep neural networks, reinforcement learning (RL) achieves tremendous empirical successes. However, its theoretical understandings lag behind. In particular, it remains unclear how to provably attain the optimal policy with a finite regret or sample complexity. In this talk, we will present the two sides of the same coin, which demonstrates an intriguing duality between pessimism and optimism. - In the online setting, we aim to learn the optimal policy by actively interacting with…

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ESE Seminar: “Surpassing Fundamental Limits through Time Varying Electromagnetics”

March 16 at 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Zoom – Email ESE for Link jbatter@seas.upenn.edu

Surpassing the fundamental limits that govern all electromagnetic structures, such as reciprocity and the delay-bandwidth-size limit, will have a transformative impact on all applications based on electromagnetic circuits and systems. For instance, violating principles of reciprocity enables non-reciprocal components such as isolators and circulators, which find application in full-duplex wireless radios, radar, bio-medical imaging, and quantum computing systems. Overcoming the delay-bandwidth-size limit enables ultra-broadband yet extremely-compact devices whose size is not fundamentally related to the wavelength at the operating frequency.…

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ESE Seminar: “Synthetic dimensions: harnessing light’s internal degrees of freedom for quantum, nonlinear and topological photonics”

March 18 at 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Zoom – Email ESE for Link jbatter@seas.upenn.edu

Scaling up next-generation photonic systems in a resource-efficient manner is a ubiquitous challenge for quantum technologies such as quantum networks, quantum simulation and computation, and for classical technologies such as photonic neural networks, LiDAR and communications. From a fundamental perspective, high-dimensional lattices hold promise for realizing and manipulating exotic states of light and matter, complementing the recent surge in studying low-dimensional physics using 2D materials, quantum materials and cold atoms. I will show how we can endow photons with “synthetic…

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ESE Seminar: “Engineering Quantum Processors in Silicon”

March 25 at 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Zoom – Email ESE for Link jbatter@seas.upenn.edu

Across the globe, physicists in academia and industry alike are competing to be the first to build a scalable universal quantum computer. Amongst the multitudes of quantum computing architectures, solid-state quantum processors based on spins in silicon are emerging as a strong contender. Silicon is an ideal material to host spin qubits: it supports long coherence times , has excellent prospects for scaling, and is ubiquitous in the semiconductor industry. While semiconductor spin qubits were proposed over two decades ago…

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April 2021

ESE Seminar: “Engineering (Useful) Quantum Systems”

April 1 at 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Zoom – Email ESE for Link jbatter@seas.upenn.edu

Quantum technologies have the potential to revolutionize sensing, communication, and computation. To realize this potential, it will be necessary to scale the size and complexity of engineered quantum systems by several orders of magnitude, without sacrificing coherence or fidelity. Trapped ion qubits provide unparalleled coherence and are a leading platform for current small-scale quantum technology demonstrations. Optical addressing of individual ions with low crosstalk enables high-fidelity single and multi-qubit gates, and ions trapped in the same potential naturally allow for…

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ESE Seminar: “Harnessing Light-Matter Interaction for Photonic Quantum Technologies”

April 6 at 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Zoom – Email ESE for Link jbatter@seas.upenn.edu

Photonic quantum technologies have a unique potential for applications such as large-scale quantum networks and quantum-enhanced sensing. Furthermore, photons provide new paradigms for quantum simulations and a testbed for benchmarking the advantage of quantum simulators over the classical ones. These applications demand novel resources such as efficient single-photon sources, large clusters of entangled photons, and nonlinear optical gates. A 1D-atom, a quantum emitter coupled to a single optical mode with high efficiency, can deliver these functionalities. In this talk, I…

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